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This month's theme is London's Arts and Craft

  • Bible cover dated 1577
The embroidery on the cover was said to have been worked by Queen Elizabeth I.

    Stitches in Time: learning through remaking

    Anna Laviniere, a Collections Management trainee at the Museum of London, tells us what she has learned about one extraordinary object in the collections through the process of remaking.

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  • Crown made from gilt metal and set with multicoloured paste stones. There is a padded textile band around the inside. (ID no.: A23255/14)

    Faking it! (with style)

    Fakes and clever imitations have played an important role in London’s fashion history. Often unable to afford the real deal, Londoners on a budget sought out clever imitations to stay à la mode! We look at some brilliant fakes from our collection.

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  • Museum of London's Vegetable Dolls by Una Maw

    Vegetable patch: conserving Una Maw's dolls

    The museum's Vegetable Dolls are amazing hand-made dolls depicting a range of extraordinary characters. But before we could put these century-old dolls on display, we had to restore them to their former glory.

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  • Headstone Manor Whitefriars Glass book

    Headstone Manor: inspiring Whitefriars Glass

    Some of the most beautiful objects in the London collection are those produced by the famous Whitefriars glassworks of James Powell and Sons. In partnership with the Museum of London, Headstone Manor in Harrow have for the first time digitised a 19th century book of designs revealing the inspiration for some of the striking Whitefriars Glass in our collections.

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  • Smaller than a five pence coin, the smallest dragon resides in storage at the Museum of London.

    The smallest dragon in London

    Smaller than a five pence coin, the smallest dragon resides in storage at the Museum of London. An object of fascination, almost nothing is known about it, aside from that it was made and used in medieval London.

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  • Claire Partington’s version of the Roman goddess of love, beauty and fertility, Venus, is also an amalgamation of Hindu mythology, Renaissance Madonna and a modern everyday woman.

    Venus: an allegory of love, mythology and womanhood

    Claire Partington’s version of the Roman goddess of love, beauty and fertility, Venus, is also an amalgamation of Hindu mythology, Renaissance Madonna and a modern everyday woman. We take a deep dive into the different references that can be seen in this fantastic ceramic figure.

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  • Laura Carlin tiles in London Making Now

    Tiles, tiles, and more London tiles!

    From Roman Londinium and 18th-century coffee houses to modern-day Tube stations, London has been home to a vibrant and varied ceramic tile industry for centuries. Here’s a reminder, as we walk the streets of London, to look up and around ourselves, and enjoy this city of tiles.

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  • vegetable kingdom, vegetable dolls, cloth dolls, una maw

    Inside The Vegetable Kingdom

    Lucie Whitmore, fashion curator, tells us the story of the cloth dolls of The Vegetable Kingdom and their eccentric maker, Una Maw.

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  • detailed, hand-assembled flowers were used to decorate dresses, bonnets and hats, several of which are included in the display

    The lost art of flower-making

    This interview takes you into the vanished world of Victorian flower-makers with Beatrice Behlen, senior curator of fashion and decorative arts, and Natasha Fenner, curatorial assistant.

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  • A hand-painted porcelain egg, decorated with flowers and gold thorns. (ID no.: NN13073)

    Easter egg hunting at the Museum of London

    What happens when we go Easter egg hunting across the museum’s 7-million-strong collection? In our egg-citing basket, we found a real medieval egg, those with sombre WWII associations, a quirky egg-heeled shoe, a mysterious egg by the River Thames, and so much more! We’re not egg-agerating when we say it’s an egg-cellent collection.

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  • Miniature model of a Roman axe, with modern coin for scale
Roman, probably AD 43-200; ID no. BRE74A[59]<3>

    Marvellous miniature Roman relics

    The Museum of London's Archaeological Archive houses a vast collection of more than one million objects, far more than we can display in our galleries. Delving into our stores, Glynn Davis selects three of the smallest items from our Roman collections, each with a big story behind them.

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  • An engraved sperm whale tooth mounted on silver. Presented Alexander Munro to Sophia Knight, probably as a love token. (ID no.: 2018.25)

    Crafted love: bent coins, lovespoons and a whale’s tooth!

    Love can be strange, and sometimes, so can tokens of love. Looking through the Museum of London’s extensive collection, we throw the spotlight on some quirky ‘love tokens’ with an element of craft, which have both romanticism (of creating something with one’s own hands) and practicality (spoons, stay busks or ironing boards!). Interestingly, the similarity of many of these customs range from Europe to Asia!

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